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New Product Alert

Posted on January 18, 2021 at 9:18 AM Comments comments (50)
                      New Product Alert!!!

We are currently trialing some new products:

        3 Protein Mix @ $1.95lb

        Boneless Beef Blend @ $2.40lb

        Chicken Blend Mix @ $1.90lb

Please feel free to ask for one complimentary 1lb tester



The Disturbing Cause Of Dental Disease In Dogs

Posted on February 27, 2015 at 11:07 AM Comments comments (220)
Are your dog’s teeth shiny white?
Most dogs’ teeth aren’t.
According to Dr Brooke Niemiec of the American Veterinary Dental College, dental disease is the number one medical problem among pets today!

In fact, over 70 percent of dogs and cats will suffer periodontal disease by the age of two.

Dental Disease Affects More Than Your Dog’s Mouth
Studies have linked periodontal disease in both humans and pets to systemic diseases of the kidneys and liver, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes complications, problems during pregnancy, and even cancer.

Did you know that dangerous Chinese ingredients are lurking in virtually every pet food - even the premium brands?

“These serious health concerns develop or are made worse by the constant presence of oral bacteria flushing into the bloodstream through inflamed or bleeding gum tissue. The good news is that many of these conditions improve once the dental disease is resolved and good oral hygiene is maintained.”

How To Reverse Dental Disease
Holistic vets know that a simple change in diet can often be enough to reverse dental disease in dogs.
Veterinarian Michael Fox claims, “Obesity and dental problems are associated with highly processed manufactured pet foods, especially those high in cereals.”

Homeopathic veterinarian Don Hamilton agrees.
“High levels of sugars and simple carbohydrates provide rapidly available nutrition for oral bacteria.”

So it would appear that commercial pet foods, all of which contain about 40% sugars and carbohydrates, are the main cause of dental disease in dogs.

Australian veterinarian Tom Lonsdale has also seen significant changes in the dental health of his patients by simply changing their diet from kibble to a species appropriate, raw diet. The changes he has seen are so significant that he calls kibble “junk food.”
This might sound harsh calling kibble junk food, but what Dr Lonsdale did next goes a long way to prove his point …

The Experiment
Since Dr Lonsdale had become accustomed to seeing drastic improvements in dental health with the change from kibble and commercial pet foods to a raw diet, he wondered “How quickly will healthy dogs start to deteriorate if we feed them junk food?”
And a very interesting study was begun …

Dr Lonsdale recruited four raw fed dogs and, for the next 17 days, he fed them kibble – Science Diet veterinary food to be exact.
The results were visible.

The subject dogs’ teeth were white and healthy while they were eating a raw, species appropriate food, and the stinky breath, yellow teeth, and sore bleeding gums occurred just 17 days after feeding a veterinary diet.

“Because they haven’t been scrubbed away by the appropriate food, the bacteria multiplied,” explains Dr Lonsdale. “And they’re now gaining access to these dogs’ mouths, and from the mouth to the rest of the body. And that, we believe, is the reason why animals end up with many diseases of the liver, the kidneys, the heart, the immune system, and so on.”

Dr Fox warns,
“Maintaining  pets’ dental hygiene, along with good nutrition – where highly processed pet food ingredients, especially corn and soy glutens, leave micro-particles adhering to the teeth and foster dental disease – prevents much animal suffering. Dental problems, closely related to diet, are very common in dogs and cats and are often left untreated for too long, causing much suffering and long crippling, even fatal illness. These include kidney, liver and heart disease secondary to periodontal disease.”

The Conclusion
Dental cleaning under anesthesia has become the norm, given that the vast majority of dogs suffer from dental disease (because the vast majority of dogs are fed kibble and starch-laden diets).

But this only compounds the risk of feeding your dog a processed diet.
In an article entitled Remove Malpractice Risk from Anesthetic Risk published in DVM Newsmagazine, June 1st, 2004, veterinarian and attorney Dr Christopher Allen wrote, “Clients who sue are shocked clients; they sue after they bring in a reasonably healthy looking pet but leave with their animal in a plastic bag. They sue when their high-risk pet dies under anesthesia and no one fully explained the concept of anesthetic risk. A disproportionate number involve pet deaths that have occurred while an animal was sedated or under anesthesia.”

Dr Fox adds,
 
Clearly, Dr Lonsdale’s little experiment should be a wakeup call for pet owners.

“Do wolves die toothless? Or live with decayed teeth, tartar encrusted teeth, or yellow teeth? Of course not. How is this possible?”

Perhaps, says Dr Falconer, more importantly the question should be: how did we come to believe all this hype about teeth brushing and dentistry? And what sorts of things have we foisted on the animals that has caused all this dental disease?

“It can only be that this chronic disease has come from our deviating from the wild model, raising our pets in ways that are quite different from that of their ancestors and wild cousins, the wolf and bobcat.”

Veterinarian Sara Chapman concludes, “Raw meaty bone diets keep wild carnivores’ teeth in top condition, and they can do the same for our domesticated carnivores. Even ground raw diets help prevent tartar build up, as the meat contains natural enzymes, and raw diets do not stick to the teeth, unlike diets that are high in starch. Kibble (dry food) has long been touted as helping to keep teeth clean because of its abrasive action. If you have ever watched your dog eat kibble, you have surely noticed that they don’t chew the stuff, they bolt it down whole. I encourage all my clients to feed a balanced, high quality raw diet if possible; balanced high quality cooked or canned diets are acceptable alternatives if they can not feed raw.”

Despite proper diet, some dogs are genetically predisposed to dental disease … especially toy breeds and short-nosed breeds.

Dr Becker offers these other solutions to keep your dog’s mouth healthy and bacteria-free:
· Offer recreational, raw bones. Offering your pet raw knuckle bones to gnaw on can help remove tartar the old fashioned way – by grinding it off through mechanical chewing. There are some rules to offering raw bones (not for pets with pancreatitis, diseases of the mouth, weak or fractured teeth, resource guarders, “gulpers,” etc.) so ask your holistic vet if raw bones would be a good “toothbrush” for your dog. I recommend offering a raw bone about the same size as your pet’s head to prevent tooth fractures.
· If your dog cannot or should not chew recreational raw bones, I recommend you offer a fully digestible, high quality dental dog chew.

Perform routine mouth inspections. Your pet should allow you to open his mouth, look inside, and feel around for loose teeth or unusual lumps or bumps on the tongue, under the tongue, along the gum line and on the roof of his mouth. After you do this a few times, you’ll become sensitive to any changes that might occur from one inspection to the next. 
You should also make note of any differences in the smell of your pet’s breath that aren't diet-related.

A Homeopathic First Aid Kit for Pets

Posted on February 6, 2015 at 10:17 AM Comments comments (185)

Now is the time to start planning the remedies you want to carry in your medicine cabinet … before your dog needs them!

Although homeopathy can be challenging to apply in chronic cases, it’s really quite easy for dog owners to effectively treat simple, acute cases with just a few remedies.  If given shortly after symptoms are seen, the right remedy can help your dog recover much more quickly.  Having the right remedies on hand can be especially important if you don’t have immediate access to quality veterinary care … although they can also be a life saver while you’re driving on the way to the emergency vet!

Acute disorders are illnesses and injuries that happen suddenly, often with obvious symptoms.  Because acute problems are quite easy for us to identify, finding the right remedy can be a fairly simple project.  What follows is a short list of problems your dog may run into and corresponding remedies that you can use to quickly reduce symptoms.

INSECT BITES AND STINGS
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Stung area is swollen, bruised and painful.
Arnica montana followed by:
Ledum palustre
Stung area is very inflamed and appears blistered
Cantharis
Allergic reaction to the sting
Carbolic acid
Stung area is red, feels hot and swollen
Apis mellifica

FOREIGN BODIES (FOXTAILS AND SPLINTERS)
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Foreign bodies
Silicea, Myristica sebifera

HOT SPOTS
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Red or white with swelling
Apis mellifica
Sudden heat and redness
Belladonna
Yellow, oozing discharge
Graphites

POISONING, VOMITING AND DIARRHEA
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Vomiting with frequent straining and small amounts of stool
Nux vomica
Vomiting with watery stools, thirst and dehydration
Arsenicum album

KENNEL COUGH
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Ticklish throat, aggravated by pressure on throat and lying down
Drosera
Early stages and fever
Aconitum napellus
Dry cough aggravated by motion, abdominal breathing
Bryonia

SHOCK
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Shock
Aconitum napellus
Shock due to blood loss
Arnica and China

CUTS AND LACERATIONS
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Puncture wounds and cuts with jagged edges
Hypericum perforatum
Trauma with bruising and bleeding
Arnica montana

ALLERGIC REACTIONS
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Hot, red swelling
Apis mellifica
Bumpy, itchy rash
Rhus toxicodendron

BREAKS, SPRAINS AND STRAINS
Key Symptoms and Remedy

Muscle Strain
Arnica montana followed by
Calendula officinalis
Joint Sprain
Arnica montana followed by
Rhus toxicodendron, Ruta graveolens

While this isn’t a complete list, it’s a great start and a perfect way to start building your own emergency kit with just a few remedies.

Purchase your remedies in 30c potency. A dose for all dogs, regardless of size, is three pellets. The more acute the injury, the more often you should dose. For sudden, traumatic episodes, you can repeat every five to 90 minutes and for milder cases, every day or two. Once you see an improvement in symptoms, stop giving the remedy.

Having these remedies readily available can make the difference between a fast and slow recovery for your dog.

Good Luck!!


5 Nutritious Herbs that Benefit Dogs (and us)

Posted on December 16, 2014 at 10:28 PM Comments comments (117)
When I think of pet nutrition, I of course go immediately to the whole food diet and the necessary balance of the diet. But my next thought is the importance of the absorption of the nutrients within the diet, which is where nutritive herbs play an important part of good and balanced nutrition.
Nutritive herbs are classified by the specific nutritional value they provide. They can enhance your dog’s diet in a variety of ways.

The Benefits of Nutritional Herbs for Dogs
  • They can provide medicinal effects like fiber, mucilage, diuretic, adaptogenic, and can play a key role in the absorption of vital nutrients
  • They can be considered as both food and medicine as they have the elements of each
  • They can contain carbohydrates, fats and proteins along with the vitamins and minerals necessary for good nutrition
  • They can boost the immune system
  • They can cleanse and alkalize (detoxify) the body
  • They are nourishing to our pets on the deepest level: brain, bones, muscles, skin, coat, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys
  • Although they’re not a substitute for animal protein, they offer wonderful supplementation

It’s becoming increasingly clear that to achieve the best health ever in our pets, they need to consume a balanced diet rich in good quality animal protein with absorbable vitamins, minerals and trace minerals. These can be supplemented with nutritive herbs, which offer a concentrated, synergistic and nutrient-rich balance.
Nutritive herbs can be given in either a dried or extracted preparation. They’re readily available, affordable and palatable, which makes it easy to add them to meals. Here are a few popular and easy to find nutritive herbs that you might consider offering to your dog.

Burdock Root (Arctium lappa)
This is a common weed that grows in almost any uncultivated space. Medicine from the root is viable only from first year plants. Burdock is most valuable for skin conditions and should be used over a long period of time to remove any systemic imbalance, which is often the cause. Part of the action of this herb is through the bitter stimulation of digestive juices and bile secretion, which aids digestion and appetite, and absorbs toxins from the bowel.
As a food, burdock root is delicious and cooks up a lot like a potato in a stew, but with a mild, sweet, mucilaginous flavor. Pets love the taste and it can be given in a powdered state or even cooked fresh. Burdock root is high in carbohydrates and inulin, and very high in iron, magnesium, silicon, thiamine, sodium, potassium, phosphorus and chromium. Burdock is also a cleansing herb with a balanced mineral content.

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)
Commonly used worldwide as an animal feed, alfalfa (also known as the king of herbs), has been cultivated for thousands of years. Alfalfa is renowned as a cure for all inflammations, including arthritis and is thought to be hypocholesterolemic (lowers cholesterol) and hypoglycemic. Alfalfa is also a blood purifier and bitter tonic, and contains the digestive enzyme betaine, which makes it a digestive aid as well.
Alfalfa also contains a good supply of natural chlorophyll, the green color found in plants. Chlorophyll oxidizes quickly when cut, so it’s best to use alfalfa in an extract or to dry it quickly to maintain the nutritive properties. Alfalfa has 21% crude fiber, is 20% protein and is very high in Vitamin A, Vitamin C, copper and niacin amongst many other minerals, making it a rich source of nutrients.

Ginseng
I didn't include the botanical name here as there are over 700 plants that are from this family. Grown throughout Southeast Asia and tropical North America, we typically see upwards of 11 plants in North America, including Panax and American. This is what this information is based on.
As pets age, their ability to absorb nutrients can decline, creating under-nourishment. This results in loss of energy and alertness, and an increased risk of illness. Not only is ginseng known as an appetite stimulant, but studies also show it can increase the ability of the intestine to absorb nutrients. Ginseng contains strong antioxidant components that help the body recover from stress, fatigue and illness. It also contains anti-inflammatory saponins that can also help regulate cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Another component in ginseng root is geranium, which has a powerful hydrogenating effect on the body, especially the liver.

Turmeric Root (Curcuma longa)
Turmeric is the major spice found in most curry powders and is easily identified by its stark yellow/orange color. It’s known for its anti-inflammatory properties and is anti-arthritic. Turmeric can also used to treat bruises, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and is antiseptic.
The nutritive uses are many, including cleansing the colon of parasites, helping rid the body of yeast infections, reducing inflammation in the digestive tract, helping to eliminate flatulence and increasing the production of enzymes in the liver that metabolize toxins.
Turmeric is high in calories, fat, magnesium, manganese, niacin, potassium, selenium, silicon and sodium and contains many other minerals and vitamins. Turmeric can be used as a fresh grated root, which can be added directly to food or cooked in broths. It can also be used in powdered or extract form. Turmeric should be used in small amounts to prevent digestive upset.

Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica)
Known as “stinging nettle” by its common name, once dried or extracted there is no sting left to the nettle leaf and it has a diminished chance of allergic reaction. In fact, fresh extractions are used to combat seasonal allergies by treating imbalances of the mucous membranes.
Nettle is a blood purifier, it can be a diuretic where there is excess fluid, it increases kidney and liver function and aids digestion. Nettle is high in calcium, chromium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, thiamine and Vitamin A.
Nettle is also a catalyst for the absorption of many vitamins, minerals and trace minerals as well as several other herbs.

This certainly is not an exhaustive list, but these herbs are most effective with pets and easily obtainable. Most can be found organically grown, ethically wild harvested, or even in your own yard. Feel free to experiment with one herb or make a compound blend of several, based on your dog’s individual needs

How to Protect Your Dog from Rabies Vaccine Damage

Posted on November 19, 2014 at 11:42 AM Comments comments (127)
If you don’t think one rabies vaccine can change your dog’s life forever, then you might want to read what I’m about to share …
A story just crossed our desk about Mia Kraft, a 3 year old girl who had her face disfigured by her grandparents’ dog. “I don’t really know what happened,” said Rick Taylor, the owner of the dog and Mia’s grandfather. “My dog just went for her.” The reason for Mr Taylor’s confusion was that his dog Tebow, a 5 year old American Bulldog, had regularly been with Mia with no previous issues. “She has been around it since she was born,” Taylor said. “He is really well-trained, he is very friendly. I just don’t understand.” And Tebow’s vet isn’t helping him to understand …
Vets Refuse to Recognize Vaccine Damage
The interesting part of this story is the day before Tebow bit Mia, he was vaccinated for rabies, along with parvovirus and distemper. The first problem with this is that a five year old dog shouldn’t need to be vaccinated for parvovirus and distemper … these vaccines have been shown to protect animals for a minimum of 7 years (and in the case of distemper, as long as 15 years). But the bigger problem is that one rabies vaccine seems to have cost Mia a lot of pain …… and ultimately cost Tebow his life.
The day before his attack on Mia, Tebow was vaccinated at Countryside Veterinary Small Animal Clinic. Countryside owner and veterinarian Bruce Hood said in his 20 years of experience he has never heard of vaccines leading to aggressive behavior in dogs. “Usually if we have any kind of reaction, we will have an immediate reaction of breaking out in hives or some swelling in the face, or they will be lethargic for 12 to 24 hours,” Hood said. “But even that is rare.” Hood said he doesn’t remember Tebow exhibiting any aggressive behavior on Friday, and he doesn’t know what might have been behind Saturday’s bite. “If the dog was startled, it could have been a reflex reaction,” Hood said. “It is hard to say exactly what the scenario was.” Wiseman said Tebow may have been a little more irritable than normal if he was sore from the vaccines and being touched in a sensitive area may have led to a reflex reaction. A reflex reaction that happened just once … and just one day after his rabies vaccination. Cynthia Wiseman, a veterinarian at Springfield Veterinary Clinic who was contacted by the News-Leader for comment about the attack, echoed Hood’s comments, saying she has never heard of vaccines leading to aggression in dogs.
Which is curious………..
Because there are plenty of cases just like Tebow’s … if only vets would open their eyes to them.
Not an Isolated Case
Maggie was an eight month old healthy and happy female German Shepherd puppy who lived in Jacksonville, Florida, with Robert Davis and Ashley Shell and their three beautiful children. Maggie’s life changed completely the day she received her first rabies vaccination. Within hours of her vaccination, a golf ball sized mass developed at the sight of the injection. Almost immediately, Maggie became lethargic, refusing food and water over a few days, as well as developing red eyes, along with nasal discharge, as her body tried to rid itself of the harmful neurotoxins that were clearly affecting her. Within three to four days of the jab, Maggie developed what appeared to be “rabies-like” symptoms, which included increasing aggression toward her loved ones, accompanied by a deranged stare and dilated pupils, a newly found affinity to chew wood, increasing desire to ingest her own feces and other indigestible items, fascination with reflections, severe restlessness at times with destruction of bedding and pillows, inability to follow directions, loss of impulse control, development of reverse sneezing as well as, of course, the worsening development of multiple grand-mal seizures daily.
Ignored By Vets Again
In spite of multiple visits to various traditional veterinarians, no local veterinarians would admit that her rabies vaccination played any role in Maggie’s symptoms. In fact, most of the vets became combative and defensive when this possibility was brought up. One vet even went so far as to say that the golf ball sized lump had nothing to do with the rabies vaccination, but was more likely due to Maggie “bumping into something.” But while many conventional veterinarians refuse to see the link between rabies vaccination and aggression, there are many holistic vets who clearly see the link. Understanding that link between individual chronic diseases and the rabies vaccine involves what homeopathic physician Samuel Hahnemann called a miasm.
Rabies Miasm
The miasm is an underlying disease, like the part of the iceberg lurking beneath the water’s surface. You can see and deal with the tip of the iceberg — in this case, individual disease symptoms — but the iceberg’s essence (the miasm) is submerged, unreachable and deadly. “Clinically,” says homeopathic veterinarian Dr Richard Pitcairn, “you see certain symptoms. A miasm is a chronic disturbance unrecognized except as it’s manifested by acute flare-ups of what seem to be individual diseases.” “What I’ve seen happen is, after vaccination, dogs develop what we call the ‘rabies miasm’, where they become more aggressive, more likely to bite, more nervous and suspicious,” notes Dr Pitcairn. “They may also have a tendency to run away, to wander, and also sometimes to have excessive saliva, and to tear things up. It’s not that they have rabies, but they seem to express some symptoms of the disease from exposure to the vaccine.” The symptoms of rabies miasm suggest that it’s much more common than you might suspect.
Rabies Miasm Symptoms
  • Hypersensitivity of all senses
  • Rage, agitation, violence, ferocity, sudden attacks, unprovoked attacks
  • Irrational fears, timidity, suspicions
  • Inappropriate responses to water – either extreme fear or great desire
  • Obsessive/compulsive behaviors – tail chasing, fly biting, chasing balls
  • Excessive focal licking
  • Excessive sexual drives
  • Sensitivity to close places or tight clothing/collars
  • Sensitivity and over-reaction to noise
  • Frequent or spasmodic sneezing
  • Spasms in the jaws
  • Choking, gagging, or coughing when swallowing liquids
  • Reverse sneezing, laryngeal spasms
  • Involuntary urination
  • Constant or unwarranted erections, even in neutered males
  • Excessive licking of genitalia
  • Sensation of flea bites, violent itching with no obvious causation
  • Convulsions especially from the sight of running water or of shiny objects
  • Aimless wandering and vocalization
So homeopaths are able to clearly see how vaccines can cause aggression and a myriad of other physical symptoms. But what about scientific research?
How Vaccines Cause Aggression
Every vaccine has two components: the actual virus that it is meant to create an immune response to, such as parvovirus, and an immune adjuvant that enhances the immune response. Vaccine adjuvants are typically made from a variety of highly toxic compounds including aluminum, MSG, and mercury. Adjuvants are added to boost the immune system, or to make it react as intensely as possible for as long as possible. Dr Russell Blaylock MD warns: “Studies have shown that these adjuvants, from a single vaccine, can cause immune over-activation for as long as two years. This means that the brain microglia remain active as well, continuously pouring out destructive chemicals. In fact, one study found that a single injection of an immune activating substance could cause brain immune over-activation for over a year. This is very destructive.” To better understand what happens in the brain, Dr Harold Buttram and Catherine Frompovich write: “In explanation, microglia and astrocytes are first-line immunological responder cells located in the brain that defend against foreign infectious invaders. Normally this response, such as to a viral infection, is of limited duration and harmless to the brain. However, when microglia and astrocytes are over-stimulated for prolonged periods, which vaccine adjuvants are designed to bring about, this extended activation can be very destructive to the brain causing inflammation and/or bleeding.” How to Protect Your Dog from Rabies Vaccine Damage
Two days after his attack on Mia, Tebow’s owner signed his release, relinquishing ownership to Animal Control. It’s reported Tebow will be held there for a 10 day observation period, and then euthanized. Tebow’s case is not isolated. Fortunately for Maggie, her family caught her symptoms and worked with a homeopathic vet to resolve them before she bit any of the kids. Maggie continues to improve … and hopefully there is a rabies exemption in her state or her troubles will start all over again with the next vaccine. Finally, support the Rabies Challenge Fund.  World renowned scientists, W Jean Dodds DVM and Ronald D Schultz PhD are working as volunteers to increase the interval between rabies boosters by proving that the vaccine gives immunity, first for five years, and then for seven years. They’re also working to establish a blood “titer standard” to provide a scientific basis to avoid unnecessary boosters with a simple blood test. This non-profit group is supported solely by dog lovers and dog groups.

Soy

Posted on October 17, 2014 at 6:39 PM Comments comments (1)
If you ever travel the world you’ll find out that, after the weather, food is always the topic of conversation. Living by the Mediterranean back in the 90’s, one thing I vividly remember was being bombarded by so many different types of new foods; I wanted to try everything! This article, however, is about one type of food that I particularly fell in love with. My love for this member of the legume family started when my mom would crack open fresh soybeans and add them to all her delicious dishes. Back then, wonderful soy was sold in every fruit and vegetable stand along the side of every road. When buying produce, you would always grab fresh soybeans. When I moved back to North America in the early 2000s, you might think soy and I broke up. On the contrary, I got to eat soy all the time. Not in its usual green state as I was accustomed to, but in a whole bunch of different forms: sauces, cheeses, and even a spongy substance that tasted like chicken called tofu! In fact, one of the main reasons I loved Chinese food was because I got to use soy sauce all the time. There was a big buzz about “soy foods” at that time. You couldn’t switch to any channel on TV without hearing about the miracle protein source of soy. We were constantly blasted with all its benefits: High in Protein! Zero Cholesterol! Heart Healthy! Cancer Fighter! I ate soy products every chance I got so that I could be “healthy.” And if I had had dogs back then – thank goodness I didn’t! – they would have been eating soy along with me. A super health food… not.        At least, not anymoreWhy Soy Shouldn’t Be In Pet Foods Here we are almost 20 years later and things have drastically changed. Just recently I was attending an herbal class where I was learning how to mix up some wonderful herbs for the longevity of my fur kids. At the end of class, the folks in attendance posed questions to the herbal professor. One question almost caused the professor to flip over her desk. “Is it okay to add soy milk to our herbal infusions?” As if someone had stuck a giant rotten fish under her nose, the professor’s lips curled as she replied: “Are you serious! Soy milk?” The poor lady who asked the question seemed puzzled as to what the big deal was. So the professor asked the classroom if anyone knew why she reacted this way to the soy question. “Soy will kill you!” someone yelled out. The poor lady who asked the question had no idea what was going on with today’s soybean situation – or should I say, today’s genetically-modified (GMO) soybean situation. Cue the cheesy elevator music. It’s soybean history time. 90% Of American Soybeans Are Genetically Modified The good ol’ American soybean is the second largest US grown crop after the not-so-delicious corn crop. In fact, only Brazil grows more soybeans than the US. Today, since less than 1 per cent of soybeans are grown organically and 9 per cent naturally, this makes the remaining 90 per cent of soy crops genetically modified. Now because most folks don’t eat this crop in its green state, the soybeans are mushed up and broken into fats or oils and the other part into meal. Humans get the fats and oils and the soybean meal is sold primarily for animal feed. Yes, that includes your dog and cat. The pet food industry has taken a liking to soybean products because they’re high in protein count, they add bulk to pet foods, the amino acids seem right and the cost of the protein itself is super cheap. For the most part, soy is being offered as a wonderful option for pets with food allergies. Let’s face it: with allergies on the rise, soy sounds like a lot better option than chicken, which a health professional usually tries to tell you is the prime suspect for an allergy reaction. Right? It seems like a no-brainer option when the pet owner is told that they can check off their list: High in protein: check! Allergy relief source: check! Super healthy: check! “Giddy up,” the pet owner thinks! Give me some SOY pet food! But wait a minute… For millions of pet owners out there today who are pumping soy products into their pets, are they aware of the research being conducted, and the warnings that are swirling around social media? What warnings? Ahem. The ugly truth of soybean dangers: exposed! Here’s what you might find when you start digging: “High levels of the pesticide RoundUp have been found in GMO soy used in foods in the United States”, according to researchers in Norway. (Elsevier publication, June 2014)“The soybean contains large quantities of natural toxins or ‘antinutrients.’ They can produce serious gastric distress, reduced protein digestion and chronic deficiencies in amino acid uptake. Soybeans also contain haemagglutinin, a clot-promoting substance that causes red blood cells to clump together.” (Cinderella’s Dark Side, Sally Fallon & Mary G Enig, PhD)“Soy interferes with the thyroid gland’s ability to make T4 (thyroxine) and (T3) tri-iodothyronine, hormones necessary for normal thyroid function. In dogs, the result is hypothyroidism.” (Dr Jean Dodds)“The UK is one of the few countries that conduct a yearly evaluation of food allergies. In March 1999, researchers at the York Laboratory were alarmed to discover that reactions to soy had skyrocketed by 50 per cent over the previous year. Genetically modified soy had recently entered the UK from US imports and the soy used in the study was largely GMO. John Graham, spokesman for the York laboratory, said, “We believe this raises serious new questions about the safety of GM foods’.” (Institute for Responsible Technology)“A 2004 study analyzing 24 commercial dog foods containing soy found that these products contained concentrations of phytoestrogens in large enough quantities to have a biological effect on our pets”. (PubMed) Here are the quick Cliffs Notes (Coles Notes for you Canadians) on more problems with soy and what it can do to you and your fur babies:
  • Soy is antigenic (meaning it can stimulate the production of antibodies)
  • Soy is high in goitrogens, which interfere with iodine metabolism
  • Soy denatures during high temperature processing resulting in the formation of toxic lysinoalanine and highly carcinogenic nitrosamines
  • Soy contains trypsin inhibitors (which have caused stunted growth in test animals)
  • Soy is high in phytic acid, which reduces the digestion of key nutrients
  • In humans, soy’s compounds resemble human estrogen, which blocks normal estrogen, causing infertility, and increasing the risk of breast cancer
  • Soy has high levels of manganese and aluminum, which can lead to brain damage
  • Ingestion of soybean products is linked to seizures in both dogs and cats
  • Soy can cause serious gastric distress (gas and discomfort) in our pets
And the list goes on and on and on… The Bean Of Many Aliases You can find soy-based products in most kibble, canned and veterinarian-based diets today. To suss it out is very simple, of course: all you have to do is flip to the ingredient label and find the word soy somewhere. Voil-ahhh…? Wait a minute. Where is it? Careful, my friends. Much like an international spy, the soybean has a bunch of aliases! You may not even find a hint of the word soy. It can be listed as vegetable broth, textured vegetable protein, textured vegetable protein, lecithin (from soybeans), TSF (textured soy flour), tofu, vegetable protein, natural flavoring, guar gum (contains soy protein), etc. Here’s the deal: our pets are carnivores. If you are looking for a good clean source of protein, my advice is to find a great farmer or butcher and buy your pet clean, ethically-raised, grass-fed meats and ditch the bagged soy pet food. Better yet, if you do have a bag of pet food that has soy in it, take it back to the place you bought it, bring this article along with you, and help educate the person who sold it to you about the dangers of soy. If you really want to enjoy soy or give your pet a taste, try organic fermented soybeans. Otherwise, ditch the protein like I ditched my soy sauce!

Itchy Dogs

Posted on October 6, 2014 at 4:04 PM Comments comments (155)
One of the biggest challenges a pet owner might have to face is an itchy dog. While there are can be many possible causes for why a dog is scratching and chewing, yeast could be playing a role. Controlling Your Dog’s Yeast Naturally
Yeast lives inside and outside of our pets as part of their natural flora, along with good and bad bacteria (which are pretty much what they sound like). When something disrupts the balance of these good and bad organisms, yeast will often take advantage of the situation and start to take over. There are many things that could disrupt the natural flora, including feeding too many carbs, antibiotic use and immune system diseases like hypothyroidism. While it’s important to find the underlying cause of the yeast overgrowth, there are some supplements you can introduce to your dog to help fight off yeast and encourage a rebalancing of your pet’s system. Remember to check with your holistic vet for dosing and to always start slow.
Coconut oil
As the benefits of coconut oil for humans have hit the blogosphere and TV health shows, pet nutritionists and conscientious owners have realized our beloved dogs and cats can also benefit. What’s so good about it? It contains large amounts of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), which in turn are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic. All of these contribute to coconut oil’s antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties. Since yeast is a fungus, coconut oil can help prevent and treat yeast overgrowth, including candida. It can be incorporated into your dog’s diet as well as applied to the skin. Kefir
Derived from grains packed with vitamins and minerals, kefir offers 30 different strains of good bacteria and yeast. Resembling yogurt in appearance, this probiotic powerhouse actually offers a lot more, including good bacteria Lactobacillus Caucasus, Leuconostoc, Acetobacter species and Streptococcus species, and friendly yeasts like Saccharomyces kefir and Torula kefir. Though it’s typically safe, incorporate it slowly into your pet’s diet to reduce the chance of adverse reactions.
Apple cider vinegar
Apple cider vinegar has long been known for its many uses, including everything from salad dressings to cleaning agent. So it should be of no surprise that it has long been touted for its yeast-fighting abilities, in both humans and animals, for the skin, ears and wherever else the fungus has decided to take residence. It can be applied topically, diluted with water, as an after-bath rinse, used to clean ears and added to food and/or water. The important thing is to remember to buy it organic, raw and unfiltered.
Pau d’arco
This powerful immune-booster is actually a tree from the rain forests of South America. Used in treating everything from allergies and infections to AIDS and Parkinson’s, it’s no wonder the herb is also recommended to help against yeast. Pau d’arco is available in supplement form, but it’s important to find one of a higher quality. Oregano oil:
Popularized for its antibiotic properties, oregano oil is also a strong anti-fungal. It can be applied topically, put in food or diffused. A little goes a long way, especially when fed. The oil has a very strong smell that dogs might not like, so make sure to mask only a few drops in food. Also, since quality and processing matter with oregano oil, make sure to do your research when purchasing.
Fight Yeast with these Quick Recipes
Rita Hogan of Farm Dog Naturals has a couple of tricks up her sleeve when it comes to killing off yeast. If you have a dog that’s always in and around water (yeast loves moisture), apple cider vinegar is the answer. After they get out of the water for the day, fill a squeeze bottle (the kind with a long pointy end like ketchup bottles at a diner) with Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar. Stick it in your dog’s fur and squeeze.  Massage it around and on the belly too. This will help restore your dog’s healthy pH levels and discourage yeast. Then, once a week, or more if needed, massage yeasty areas with a coconut oil mixture. Let extra virgin coconut oil melt in a small glass bottle – about 8 ounces of it. Add 10 drops of lavender oil and 2 drops of lemon essential oil. Shake to mix. This coconut oil mix will last all summer. Store it in a dark place.

Itchy Dogs and What to Do

Posted on October 3, 2014 at 10:12 PM Comments comments (104)
One of the biggest challenges a pet owner might have to face is an itchy dog. While there are can be many possible causes for why a dog is scratching and chewing, yeast could be playing a role. Controlling Your Dog’s Yeast Naturally
Yeast lives inside and outside of our pets as part of their natural flora, along with good and bad bacteria (which are pretty much what they sound like). When something disrupts the balance of these good and bad organisms, yeast will often take advantage of the situation and start to take over. There are many things that could disrupt the natural flora, including feeding too many carbs, antibiotic use and immune system diseases like hypothyroidism. While it’s important to find the underlying cause of the yeast overgrowth, there are some supplements you can introduce to your dog to help fight off yeast and encourage a rebalancing of your pet’s system. Remember to check with your holistic vet for dosing and to always start slow. Coconut oil As the benefits of coconut oil for humans have hit the blogosphere and TV health shows, pet nutritionists and conscientious owners have realized our beloved dogs and cats can also benefit. What’s so good about it? It contains large amounts of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), which in turn are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic. All of these contribute to coconut oil’s antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties. Since yeast is a fungus, coconut oil can help prevent and treat yeast overgrowth, including candida. It can be incorporated into your dog’s diet as well as applied to the skin. Kefir Derived from grains packed with vitamins and minerals, kefir offers 30 different strains of good bacteria and yeast. Resembling yogurt in appearance, this probiotic powerhouse actually offers a lot more, including good bacteria Lactobacillus Caucasus, Leuconostoc, Acetobacter species and Streptococcus species, and friendly yeasts like Saccharomyces kefir and Torula kefir. Though it’s typically safe, incorporate it slowly into your pet’s diet to reduce the chance of adverse reactions. Apple cider vinegar Apple cider vinegar has long been known for its many uses, including everything from salad dressings to cleaning agent. So it should be of no surprise that it has long been touted for its yeast-fighting abilities, in both humans and animals, for the skin, ears and wherever else the fungus has decided to take residence. It can be applied topically, diluted with water, as an after-bath rinse, used to clean ears and added to food and/or water. The important thing is to remember to buy it organic, raw and unfiltered. Pau d’arco This powerful immune-booster is actually a tree from the rain forests of South America. Used in treating everything from allergies and infections to AIDS and Parkinson’s, it’s no wonder the herb is also recommended to help against yeast. Pau d’arco is available in supplement form, but it’s important to find one of a higher quality. Oregano oil: Popularized for its antibiotic properties, oregano oil is also a strong anti-fungal. It can be applied topically, put in food or diffused. A little goes a long way, especially when fed. The oil has a very strong smell that dogs might not like, so make sure to mask only a few drops in food. Also, since quality and processing matter with oregano oil, make sure to do your research when purchasing. Fight Yeast with these Quick Recipes Rita Hogan of Farm Dog Naturals has a couple of tricks up her sleeve when it comes to killing off yeast. If you have a dog that’s always in and around water (yeast loves moisture), apple cider vinegar is the answer. After they get out of the water for the day, fill a squeeze bottle (the kind with a long pointy end like ketchup bottles at a diner) with Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar. Stick it in your dog’s fur and squeeze.  Massage it around and on the belly too. This will help restore your dog’s healthy pH levels and discourage yeast. Then, once a week, or more if needed, massage yeasty areas with a coconut oil mixture. Let extra virgin coconut oil melt in a small glass bottle – about 8 ounces of it. Add 10 drops of lavender oil and 2 drops of lemon essential oil. Shake to mix. This coconut oil mix will last all summer. Store it in a dark place.   For More Information:http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/the-health-benefits-of-coconut-oil/http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/so-long-yeast-hello-kefir/http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/boosting-your-dogs-immune-system/http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/three-natural-antibiotics-for-your-dog/

Is Your Dog’s Thimerosal Free Vaccine Really Free of Mercury?

Posted on July 8, 2014 at 11:01 AM Comments comments (183)
If you’re an enlightened pet owner, then you probably know about Thimerosal. If you’re really on the ball, you’ll ask your vet for Thimerosal-free vaccines. But are these vaccines what they claim to be? Why You Should Say No to Thimerosal Thimerosal is a mercury-based vaccine additive that’s been used as a preservative for decades. In 1935, five years after Thimerosal was added to vaccines, Eli Lilly (the creator of Thimerosal), was contacted by veterinary vaccine manufacturer Pittman-Moore after they declared Thimerosal to be completely safe. Pittman-Moore wrote to them: “We have obtained marked local reaction in about 50% of the dogs injected with serum containing dilutions of Merthiolate (Thimerosal). Merthioiate is unsatisfactory as a preservative for serum intended for use on dogs.” (Director of Biological Services, Pittman-Moore Company, letter to Dr. Jamieson of Eli Lilly Company dated 1935. U.S. Congressional Record, May 21, 2003, E1018, page 9). We’d agree with that statement! Since then, over 160 studies have also shown the dangers of Thimerosal.

A Sordid History Since its introduction eighty years ago, Thimerosal has suffered a less-than-spectacular track record:
  • In 1967, a study in Applied Microbiology found Thimerosal killed mice when added to vaccines.
  • In 1972, Eli Lilly found Thimerosal to be “toxic to tissue cells” in concentrations as low as one part per million (PPM), 100 times weaker than the in a typical vaccine.
  • Despite all of this ongoing and emerging data, Eli Lilly continued to promote Thimerosal as nontoxic, even including Thimerosal in topical disinfectants.
  • In 1977, ten babies at a Toronto hospital died when an antiseptic preserved with Thimerosal was dabbed on their umbilical cords.
  • In 1982, the FDA proposed a ban on over-the-counter products containing Thimerosal.
  • In 1991, the FDA considered banning Thimerosal from animal vaccines.
  • In 2006, researchers at UC Davis published a study connecting Thimerosal with disruptions in antigen-presenting cells known as dendritic cells obtained from mice. Researchers and parents had previously proposed links between childhood vaccines and autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects language skills and social interactions. The UC Davis study showed that in addition to being a direct neuro-toxicant, Thimerosal may also be an immune-toxicant, leaving the immune system vulnerable to microbes and other external influences. Samuel R. Goth et al. Uncoupling of ATP-Mediated Calcium Signaling and Dysregulated Interleukin-6 Secretion in Dendritic Cells by Nanomolar Thimerosal.


More Cover-ups Despite all of the research to the contrary, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) assures consumers that “low doses of thimerosal in vaccines do not cause harm, and are only associated with minor local injection site reactions like redness and swelling at the injection site.” But authors Brian Hooker PhD et al recently took the CDC to task on this statement and they found that the CDC’s safety research is flawed and falsified. The article, published in BioMed Research International, states that while there are over 165 studies that have focused on Thimerosal, the CDC stance that there is “no relationship between [Thimerosal] containing vaccines and autism rates in children”  is based on just six studies, which were coauthored and sponsored by the CDC. Moreover, one of the studies cited by the CDC shows a 7.6 fold increased risk of autism in infants exposed to Thimerosal. Hooker et al blew the lid off the CDC’s claims of safety and exposed their sponsored studies as biased, with some of these studies even showing Thimerosal to decrease the risk of autism! Of course, the more than 150 independent studies found Thimerosal to increase the risk of serious neurological disorders. Thimerosal Free Vaccines? Today, veterinary vaccines still contain Thimerosal – despite the dire warning signs that have been present for nearly a century.

But what of Thimerosal-free vaccines? A few companies are making Thimerosal-free canine rabies vaccines. Merial makes a Thimerosal free rabies vaccine called IMRAB 3 TF (the 3 designates a 3-year vaccine and TF stands for “Thimerosal free”). There is also a 1 year version, IMRAB 1 TF. Fort Dodge makes a Thimerosal free rabies vaccine called RABVAC 3 TF. And more Thimerosal-free vaccines may appear in the future.

That’s good news, right? Well, not exactly. It seems that there’s a little-known vaccine ingredient called an excipient. These substances are used in the production of vaccines, but aren’t an actual ingredient that’s directly added to the vaccine.

Know where this is going? That’s right……. your Thimerosal free vaccine probably still has Thimerosal in it. But because it wasn’t added directly to the vaccine, but used in production, the vaccine manufacturers can claim the vaccine is Thimerosal-free!

And this isn’t just true for veterinary vaccines. According to the CDC, there are more than a few human vaccines marketed as mercury-free that actually do have Thimerosal in them (less than 3mcgs per vaccine, but still dangerous to human health).

So how do you know if the vaccine your vet wants to give your dog has mercury in it?
You can ask for the manufacturer’s data sheet for the vaccine and phone the manufacturer and ask them to email you a list of vaccine excipients before you allow your vet to give that vaccine. But will you get the truth? Don’t count on it. Manufacturers can claim “proprietary confidentiality” when it comes to vaccine ingredients and even the FDA may not know what’s in them. Thimerosal-free vaccines may certainly be a better option than their counterparts – but the sad reality is this is nothing more than a guess. Consumers, and even the FDA, have no way of knowing if that vaccine truly is free of this dangerous neuro-toxin.

Cancer-Causing Aflatoxins Found In Dog Food

Posted on June 5, 2014 at 9:05 PM Comments comments (105)

 A recent test on dry pet food has revealed some dangerous facts about the food your dog or cat may be eating. The Consumer Council of Hong Kong recently published the results of testing performed on nearly 40 popular pet foods. The results were a shock to many pet owners. Three popular US food manufacturers, Purina, Hill’s and AvoDerm, all had foods that were found to contain aflatoxin B1.
What are Aflatoxins?
Grains such as corn, wheat, and rice, as well as nuts and legumes, are often contaminated with molds, often as a result of poor growing conditions, substandard or extended storage. Molds called aflatoxins can easily grow and produce a very potent carcinogen. Aflatoxins are very stable and even the high temperature processing involved in kibble manufacturing won’t destroy them, leaving little protection for any dog eating that food. Purina confirmed this in a statement to the South China Morning Post. They stated that cancer-causing aflatoxins were an “unavoidable natural contaminant.” AvoDerm stated that they have since removed the corn from its formula as they believed it was the source of the aflatoxins. Corn has become a major source of aflatoxin. Droughts in the US Midwest in recent years have caused a record amount of mold-infested crops amounting to nearly $75 million in insurance claims. In response to this surplus of corn that wasn’t safe for human consumption, the FDA increased the allowable amount of aflatoxin permitted in animal feed. A History of Aflatoxins and Sick Pets. The pet food industry is no stranger to product recalls due to these molds.  The earliest documented aflatoxin outbreak dates back to 1974 when hundreds of stray dogs in India died after consuming aflatoxin-contaminated corn. In 1998, 55 dogs died of contaminated corn and in December 2005, over 100 dogs were killed from aflatoxin-contaminated pet food in the US. Testing in the US also shows that apart from the recalls from high levels of aflatoxin, nearly every pet food on the market contain aflatoxins or other mold-related mycotoxins. The animal health and nutrition company Alltech analyzed 965 pet food samples and found 98% of them were contaminated with one or more mycotoxins, while 93% contained two or more mycotoxins. Even grain-free pet foods still contain a high carbohydrate content, so there is the potential for mold spores to contaminate the kibble during storage, especially if it is exposed to a moist environment. This can also happen in your home if your kibble is stored in a moist basement or an open container. How Do Aflatoxins Make Dogs Sick?
Aflatoxins primarily affect the liver and dogs who eat 0.5 to 1 mg aflatoxin/kg body weight can die within days. Smaller amounts of aflatoxins, like those found in most pet food samples, can cause sub-acute symptoms including weight loss, lethargy, jaundice and even death. Aflatoxins are also carcinogenic. They bind with DNA and cause cell mutations. Newberne and Wogan (1968) were able to produce malignant tumors in rats with less than 1 mg of aflatoxin per kg of feed. Because eating small amounts of aflatoxins over a period of time will cause cumulative liver damage or cancerous tumors, a very small percentage of affected dogs would be reported. This means that tens of thousands of cases of liver disease and cancer could be caused by contaminated foods every year, but the link would never be reported.
That’s Not All They Found
The Consumer Council study also found some other alarming trends. Three of the US brands tested (Purina, Iams and Solid Gold) also contained melamine or cyanuric acid. These are the substances that poisoned thousands of pets in 2007. On top of that, processed pet foods also contain other toxic ingredients including heterocyclic amines, acrylamides, and most recently discovered in dry, cooked pet foods, PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) – a chemical used as a flame retardant. Trevor Smith, a mycotoxin researcher at the University of Guelph, says “A shift in pet food ingredients is on. Instead of worrying about bacteria spoilage or disease contamination, like we have in the past, we now have to focus on removing mycotoxins.” Pet owners should avoid any food containing corn, especially as mold infested corns are added to animal feeds. However it’s important to also remember that melamine and other harmful substances will still be in many processed foods, so feeding fresh, whole foods remains the best way to protect your pet from cancer and other diseases that processed pet foods can cause.
Need we say more!!!!!!

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